The Lawsuit Against the Corn Refiners’ False Advertising

The Sugar Association has expanded its website to provide the public with information about several related, ongoing efforts to obtain rulings that impact public policy as it relates to high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), to broaden public awareness and encourage public participation.

HFCS is a food ingredient that has become widely used as a replacement for natural sugar during the past 40 years—the very period during which obesity, diabetes, and other metabolic diseases have been on the rise.

Whether there is a cause-and-effect relationship is a matter to be settled by science, not by market power, and The Sugar Association leaves it up to informed individuals to decide for themselves which they would rather consume, based on the available facts.

lawsuitlawsuitlawsuit
lawsuitlawsuit

However, because of concerns that a false and misleading marketing campaign was being used to obscure the truth, we joined an ongoing lawsuit that charges the biggest manufacturers of HFCS—Archer-Daniels-Midland (ADM), Cargill, Ingredion, Tate & Lyle Ingredients America—and their trade group, the Corn Refiners Association (CRA), with false advertising in violation of the Lanham Act.

The expanded section of the website provides facts about the content of this lawsuit, including information about a related, unsuccessful petition by CRA to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to change the common name of HFCS to "corn sugar."

Additionally, the website provides details about a pending FDA petition by the public advocacy group, Citizens for Health, regarding the labeling of fructose in food. The Sugar Association supports Citizens for Health in this effort, and encourages consumers to participate in the petition. More broadly, because we have long embraced the use of sound scientific principles to understand the proper dietary role of sugar—and its substitutes—we invite public involvement in the ongoing policy debate.

Please explore the sections above for more information.

Copyright 2013 The Sugar Association, Inc.